Silent Lies by Kathryn Croft. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Silent Lies by Kathryn Croft

Five years have passed since Mia’s husband, Zach, was found dead amid suspicious circumstances and a huge scandal. His former student, Josie Carpenter’s body has never been recovered. But everyone believed that he and Josie were having an affair and he killed her and then himself.

So when a woman named Allison comes to Mia for counseling, Mia is understandably confused when Allison claims to have information about Zach’s death and does not believe he killed himself. 

Mia is thrown for a loop but begins to question everything she had previously believed about her husband and the circumstances leading up to his death and about Josie, as well.

Told from Mia’s present-day perspective, as well as a few flashbacks to her life with Zach and also from Josie’s perspective leading up to Zach’s death, this is a psychological thriller with a shocking twist at the end. It also left me hoping there will be a sequel!

If you, like me, are hooked on psychological thrillers, add this one to your TBR list. It’s worth the read!

Book Details: 

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4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

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Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell

Everyone loved Ellie Mack. She was the perfect daughter, a great sister, a wonderful student. 

Just days before taking her exams and heading into an amazing summer with her boyfriend, Theo, Ellie went missing. The police eventually classified her as a runaway, but her mom, Laurel, knew Ellie would never have run away from home. Or from Theo.

Ten years after Ellie’s disappearance, the first ever evidence in the case is found but Laurel still refuses to believe the runaway theory.  But with 10 years gone by and her marriage over for seven years, Laurel begins to bring some sense of normal back to her life.

When she meets a charming man in a cafe, no one is more surprised than she is at how fast their flirting turns into a relationship. Then she meets his daughter, Poppy. 

Poppy is the spitting image of Ellie, and Laurel can’t figure out how that could be. Now Laurel’s questions about Ellie’s disappearance are more urgent than ever. Laurel must find out what happened to her daughter and who Floyd is and why and how his daughter can be exactly like Ellie.

This is the first book I have read by Lisa Jewell, but it will not be the last! I love her writing style. The book flows effortlessly from the present to the past and back again. She expertly weaves what happened to Ellie into the story in a way that allows you small glimpses of what happened to her and how it relates to what is happening between Laurel and Floyd. 

Once I started reading this novel, it was hard to put down. I was thoroughly connected to both Laurel and Ellie and I was pleased with the outcome, although there was one aspect that I really wish had been different. (Not including that, as it would be a major spoiler!)

I very highly recommend this book!

Book Details:

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5 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

Fiece Kingdom by Gin Phillips. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Fierce Kingdom by Gin Phillips

Go. Go now. Go now and buy this book Read this book! Be amazed.

This is one of the most intense stories I think I have ever read! I had to keep telling myself to breathe. I had to take short (less than 10 seconds because I could not stop reading) breaks to relax my muscles. It is that good!

Joan and her 4-year-old son, Lincoln, are at the zoo in one of their favorite places, the dinosaur pit when she realizes that it is about time for the zoo to close. 

As they are leaving, Lincoln wants to be carried and just after she picks him up she realizes the popping noises she has been hearing are not fireworks, and the odd forms on the ground ahead are people. The pops, she now realizes, are gunfire.

Just before she turns to run she sees the gunman burst through a door and fire, so she knows she cannot hide in a building. Her choices are therefore very limited.

Not knowing where the gunman is or if he is alone is terrifying to her, but not nearly as terrifying as the idea of Lincoln being hurt by him. She knows she must protect her son at all costs.

This is a mass-shooting scenario like none I have ever imagined, and it is a very scary prospect. However, it is the writing and the character development that makes this story so very, very good. Gin Phillips’ description and characterization of Lincoln endears him to the reader in a way that made me want to walk blindly into that zoo to protect him.

Fiece Kingdom by Gin Phillips. A Propensity to Discuss review.

But his mom does an incredible job of processing and protecting him as she flashes back to a childhood that in many ways prepared her for protecting herself, as well as her son.

This is an extremely well-written, well-researched novel that also lends an air of understanding into the mind of one gunman and his motivation and thought process for the destruction and havoc he is wreaking.

Yes, it is a very sensitive topic and very close to reality, but it is absolutely worth reading! I really cannot recommend this book enough. It was for me one of the most unputdownable books I have ever read!

Go.  Go now! Read this book!

Book Details:

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5 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

 

The Widower's wife by Cate Holahan. A Propensity to Discuss

The Widower’s Wife by Cate Holahan

Tom and Ana Bacon seemed to have it all. A beautiful daughter, Sophia, a French chateau-style mansion, and a wonderful marriage. A wonderful marriage until the market crashed, leaving Tom’s clients in the lurch because of his poor investments.

After being injured on the job as a detective, Ryan Monahan is now an investigator for an insurance company. HIs current assignment is to make sure suicide was not the cause of the death of Ana Bacon who fell from a cruise ship in the Bahamas.

The deeper Ryan looks, the murkier the truth becomes. Considering the debt Tom Bacon has, Ryan’s first instinct is that he killed Ana. But Tom has a rock solid alibi, confirmed by several witnesses.

Tom is adamant that Ana had been sick the whole trip due to morning sickness, also verified by other passengers, and that she would never have committed suicide and killed their baby. The more evidence Ryan finds in the case, the more he is convinced Ana was murdered. The question remains as to who killed her.

In this psychological thriller, there are a couple of impossibilities, but that does not take away from the fact that it keeps you guessing right up to the end. Even when you know the truth about that night, there are still a few twists left in the story.

All told, this is a really good book that left me somewhat shocked that I never saw it coming, even though it was right in front of me all along!  I highly recommend this book!

Book details:

The Widower’s Wife by Cate Holahan
* Hardback:  304 pages; Crooked Lane Books (August 9, 2016)
* Paperback: 304 pages; Crooked Lane Books; Reprint edition (August 8, 2017)
* Kindle:  858 KB; 304  pages; Crooked Lane Books (August 9, 2016)
* Audiobook:  9 hours 46  minutes; Teri Schnaubelt (Narrator), Tantor Audio (Publisher)

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.
4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

The Ex-Wife By Jess Ryder. A Propensity to Discuss review.

The Ex-Wife by Jess Ryder

This book had more twists and turns than a spirograph.

Natasha has a wonderful life: A husband she loves, an adorable baby girl named Emily, and a beautiful home in a very wealthy neighborhood. It is all so very different from the life she led growing up. She now never has to worry about money as Nick buys her anything she wants, plus a lot that she doesn’t want. It is, in her mind, sometimes too extravagant. Nick spoils her in every way but one.

The one thing she wants from Nick is for his ex-wife, Jen, to leave them alone. She is always coming around or calling, always intruding on their time together.

Sensing that this will never change, Natasha decides to take Emily and leave, hoping it will make him realize just how much it hurts her and how it feels to be so hurt.

However, before she can make her getaway, Nick beats her to it. One day Emily is not at the nursery at pick-up time, and all of her and Nick’s things have been cleaned out of the house when she returns home.

There is nothing the police can do. Nick is Emily’s father and Natasha admits he would never hurt her. Natasha, believing he has gone back to his ex-wife, goes to her apartment to confront them. She is shocked to find her alone and Jen swears that she hasn’t seen Nick in weeks.

Having nowhere else to turn, she agrees to let Jen help her. After all, she’s known Nick all of her life. Or does she know him at all?

Switching from the present with an unknown narrator to the past with Natasha’s point of view, you know that something went seriously wrong and hiding from the past is the only way to stay safe for at least one of the people involved.

This novel takes you up one winding rail and brings you back down another one several different times. Trust me, you’ll never figure it out on your own, which is part of what makes it such a good book and well worth your time!

As mind-games go, Jess Ryder is a fantastic player and I am looking forward to reading more of her books.

Book Details:

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4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

The Perfect Mother by Aimee Molloy

What exactly is the perfect mother? Is it a mother whose baby never cries? Who never has issues with breastfeeding? A woman who is constantly in tuned to exactly what her baby needs? Maybe a woman whose baby sleeps when it should and meets every milestone on time. Her home is spotless, her job does not consume her, her family is well-adjusted and happy? A woman who has it all?

Does the perfect mother really even exist?

No. She doesn’t. At least not in those terms. No one is perfect and even though all the books and magazines make it seem like an attainable goal, it isn’t. Sometimes mothering is hard. Sometimes nothing goes right.

For the May Mothers, a group of women who met a few months before their babies were born in May, the fear that they are failing in some way is real. From not being able to breastfeed (Francie) to being unable to be both a mom and a writer (Collette), to having to go back to work too soon (Nell). Then there is Winnie, the only single mom in the group, the one the others worry about the most. How could she possibly handle all of this on her own?

When Nell suggest a night out without the babies, they all agree except for Winnie. The other moms really want her to have a night off so Nell gets a babysitter for Winnie and she decides to accept the invitation.

By the end of a very short night, Winnie’s son Midas is missing.  The May Mothers closest to Winnie are devastated, and their “what ifs” about that night run rampant. The police bumble the investigation from the start and as days go by the talk show halfwits add to the hysteria. The May Mothers continue to try to work it out on their own, but the longer it continues, the less they are able to help.

For me, this is a terrifying story. The abduction of a baby is the stuff of nightmares. But this is a very well-written novel that keeps you guessing right up to the very end. While you know from the beginning that someone has been arrested for the crime, you don’t know who it is, Although you may have a pretty good idea. Or will you?

I highly recommend this book. If you want to know the fate of the baby in order to help you decide whether you want to read it or not, I have included a bit of a spoiler including the fate of baby Midas. Highlight the space following this to show the spoiler: Midas is not harmed. If you don’t want to know, don’t highlight between these two sentences.

I do hope you decide to read it and I really hope you will enjoy it. I certainly did!

Book Details:

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

Lies She Told by Cate Holahan. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Lies She Told by Cate Holahan

With only a month to come up with the premise and the majority of the work for her next novel, Liza Cole is struggling to find a heroine that her publisher will accept and be willing to publish. It should be easy for her, after all, her first book was a huge success, but those that followed were only met with moderate praise.

Add to that the fact that she wants nothing more than she wants a baby. Her husband seems to be much more concerned about the disappearance of his law partner than anything else, and her publisher wants her to add a gimmick character to the plot. Should be simple, right?

But sometimes, the truth is stranger than fiction, or so they say.

Enter Beth, a new mother who has seen the evidence of her husband’s cheating while she stays home and cares for their new baby. What a piece of work he is. Not to mention the other woman knows about Beth and the baby. What kind of woman has an affair with a man she knows is married?

Beth has plans. She will catch him in the act and he’ll pay for what he has done to her. But then she finds herself dumping the body of his mistress into the East River and burying the gun. Liza tries to tell her that’s not a good plan, but Beth won’t listen.

Even though Beth is only a figment of Liza’s imagination. Beth is the character in Liza’s new book, but when the final pages are written, the lines between fiction and reality and the truth and lies will all be blurred, and if she isn’t careful, she could end up in the East River, as well.

Twists and turns, this book has them! Actually, both of these books have them. You not only get the novel about Liza and her husband but the alternative story of Beth and her philandering partner. Two books in one, but boy do they come together at the end!

This is a really interesting concept of blurring the lines between a writer’s reality and the fiction she creates. And the psychiatrist that the publisher wanted to have included? Boy, that was certainly foreshadowing on his part, even though he had no way of knowing.

This is a solid 4-star read and I have already downloaded another of Cate Holahan’s books (The Widower’s Wife) to read and I’ll let you know about that one soon. In the meantime, you really may want to check this one out!

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”