The Breakdown by B A Paris. A Propensity to Discuss review.

The Breakdown by B.A. Paris

Cass is leaving her end-of-term faculty party during a huge storm and decides to take the Blackwater Lane shortcut that she promised her husband she would not take as it is a lonely and dangerous road, much more so in a storm at night. When she sees a woman stopped on the side of the road, she pulls over, but she is terrified because of the storm raging on and the isolation of the road. When the other woman doesn’t signal to her for help, Cass leaves after a few minutes.

The next morning she is horrified to learn the news of the woman’s brutal murder. She feels so much guilt over not stopping, but she cannot tell her husband Matthew because she promised not to go that way. When she realizes that she knew the murdered woman, she is racked with guilt that is accompanied by tremendous anxiety. When her best friend Rachel calls she decides she will tell her over lunch. However, she is so overwrought because she forgot that she was supposed to be buying a group gift for another friend and has no idea what the gift was supposed to be, that she decides not to tell Rachel after all.

As she begins to forget more and more things she becomes fearful that she is experiencing Early Onset Dementia like her mother, who was diagnosed at age 44. As her anxiety grows, so does her fear and then she starts receiving phone calls with no one speaking on the other end. Terror floods her mind as she believes that the killer must have seen her that night in the woods and is now out to get her.

The fear, anxiety, and forgetfulness begins to worry Matthew and he insists she go to a doctor. The doctor gives her medicine for anxiety, and, although the pills help, they keep her knocked out most of the time and she can barely function. However, not taking them leads to a breakdown. Will she ever find out who is calling her? And is she really going crazy? Or is someone out to harm her or make her harm herself?

Having read and loved B.A. ParisBehind Closed Doors (click the link for that review) I was very excited when this book came out. When it finally made it to the top of my TBR pile, I was eager to get into it. My excitement abated a bit when I did not immediately click with Cass. I liked her, but she just wasn’t a friendly person to me. I listened on, believing that I would come to like her more, and I did a little and I felt somewhat sorry for her. The story is really good, even though I didn’t love Cass and didn’t really like her husband Matthew, either. I did like her friend Rachel, however.

I wanted Cass to own up to someone about why she felt so guilty about the murdered woman, just wanted her to tell someone what she saw on the road and why she was afraid the murderer would target her. The story was really good and the twist at the end did shock me a little because I thought I had it figured out, but I had somewhat missed the mark. I really like how it ended and I came to really like Cass when she finally took control of her own destiny and stopped wallowing in self-doubt and self-pity.

B.A. Paris has another book, Bring Me Back, coming in June of 2018 and it is one that I will look forward to reading as I truly enjoy her writing style and her twists that keep you a little off-balance. I also hope that Georgia Maguire is the narrator for the next one as she beautifully narrated both Behind Closed Doors and The Breakdown. Her voice is very appealing and she gives the characters an air of dignity that I really like.

As recommendations go, if you haven’t read anything by B.A. Paris, I suggest you start with Behind Closed Doors and then read The BreakdownI liked this one, but I loved the first one and I am looking forward to the next one. Note: These are all stand-alone books, they are not a series. 

Book Details:

Other books by B.A. Paris:
Behind Closed Doors
 (2016)
Bring Me Back
 (June 2018)

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. 

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Stillhouse Lake by Rachel Caine. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Stillhouse Lake by Rachel Caine

Gina Royal, the stay-at-home mom to Lily and Brady and wife of Melvin, arrives home after picking the kids up from school to find that someone has drunkenly missed a curve and crashed into her house – into Melvin’s woodshop sanctuary, actually. When the police handcuff Gina, she is furious, after all, she didn’t cause the accident. She is then led to the workshop where the lifeless body of a woman hangs, having been brutally murdered by Melvin.

Gina knew nothing of Melvin’s crimes and gets an acquittal at her trial, but just because 12 people on a jury believed her doesn’t mean everyone else does. Stalkers constantly torment her with vicious and vile emails threatening her and her children’s lives so she goes on the run with her children using fake backstories and aliases for all three of them with the help of an anonymous computer whiz.  She manages to keep them safe by discreetly moving them around, changing their identities and always keeping track of the stalkers or Sicko Patrol, as she calls it.

Four years after her acquittal Gina, who is now Gwen Proctor and her children Atlanta (Lanny) and Connor have grown tired of running and are living in Tennessee in an area called Stillhouse Lake. Finally feeling somewhat safe, Gwen buys a house that is beginning to feel like home for all of them. Even though encountering a few rough patches starting out, the kids are settling in and hope to stay, though Gwen is still trying to overcome the near-paralyzing fear that some of the stalkers will find them and act on their threats.

Realizing how much her kids have suffered both because of their father and because of all the moving and hiding, Gwen decides to stay. Both Lanny and Connor are starting to make friends and there are actually a couple of people Gwen has somewhat befriended, even though extremely cautiously and not fully trusting anyone, and she is feeling a bit more grounded.

After being at Stillhouse Lake for several months, the body of a young woman is found with wounds much like those inflicted by Melvin on his victims and Gwen is once again terrified that her true identity will come out and that she might be accused of the crime. But her alias and background are solid, so how would anyone ever find out? Unless someone she trusts betrays her and none of them know her secret either.

Gwen diligently tries to convince herself that they are safe, but she cannot shake the feeling that someone is watching her. And if they are, neither she nor her children are safe and there is no way she can protect them by herself and she knows there is no one she can trust with her secrets.

I heard about this book for a while from Lindsey @ Reading Between the Wines, the Criminally Good Book Club, Janel @ Keeper of the Pages, and Janelle @ She Reads with Cats (These are Instagram links and these folks are great resources for book suggestions!) and after I finally broke down and signed up for Kindle Unlimited (more on that later) and this was the first book that I checked out and read. And oh my goodness, am I glad that I did!

This book was really, really good! In fact, I have already pre-ordered the sequel, Killman Creek, due out December 12, 2017. Stillhouse Lake does have a few gruesome details that may not be for the faint of heart, but if you can gloss over those parts, or just get through them, this book is well-worth reading. There is the perfect amount of detail in what Gwen went through to keep them safe with the identity changes and moving, but not so much that it bogs down the story.

While this is a somewhat dark novel, it is so well-written that, even though I might have been biting my nails, it wasn’t scary as much as it was unsettling to think about the depravity of some serial killers and what they have done. However, it also made me think many times about the aftermath that the innocent family of a serial killer leaves behind and wonder if there are as many cruel and depraved people stalking them as this novel portrays. I am sorry to say that I believe that there probably are.

Considering that I started reading it one afternoon and stayed up until 2 a.m. reading and finished the next morning, I must say that this book was pretty unputdownable and I highly recommend it!

Stillhouse Lake by Rachel Caine

Books in this series:

  1. Stillhouse Lake
  2. Killman Creek

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. 

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Kindle Paperwhite Review

As I have written before, I am a believer in the savings and convenience of Amazon Prime. I use it for everything from dog food to shoes to organizational items and, of course, books.

I have also had a Kindle e-Reader (1st or 2nd generation – it’s old!) for quite a few years and I have often considered updating it, as the one I have does not have a backlight feature and no keyboard or a touchscreen. (I know, very old school!) The lack of touchscreen is my biggest issue because when I am using it, I have to hold it with my hand in such a way that I can press the page turn button and it is not as comfortable as I would like.

Kindle Paperwhite. A Propensity to Discuss review.

My original Kindle eReader with buttons on the side.

So when the Black Friday/Cyber Monday deals came up and the Kindle Paperwhite was on sale, I decided to go ahead and upgrade as a part of my own Christmas gift (not from me to me, but from someone else to me). I am so thrilled that I made the decision and for several reasons other than just the upgrades. First, though, the Kindle e-Reader weighs 5.8 ounces and the Kindle Paperwhite weighs 7.2 ounces. That is the only negative difference that I have, but we are talking about ounces here, not pounds, so it really isn’t that big of a difference. The difference in size, as shown below, is negligible.

Kindle Paperwhite Review. A Propensity to Discuss review.

This shows both my old Kindle e-Reader and my new Kindle Paperwhite.

My reasons are as follows:

  • The upgrades

    A. I absolutely love the backlight feature! With my Kindle e-Reader, I had to have a lamp or flashlight as booklights don’t really work so well with this device.
    B. The touchscreen makes so much easier to turn pages and I don’t have to hold it in the center, but I can hold it at the bottom and just touch the corner to turn the page instead of having to press down the button that was not easy to reach one-handed. Plus, being able to use the touchscreen keyboard is so much easier than having to use the keyboard with the direction button.

Kindle Paperwhite. A Propensity to Discuss review.

This shows how bright the backlight is for the Paperwhite.

  • The features

    There are a lot of features, but some of my favorites are as follows:

    A. X-Ray – You can find all the passages across a book that mention relevant ideas, characters, places, or topics. The X-Ray timeline view lets you easily flip through notable passages to remind yourself of what’s happened in the book, or easily see images.
    B. Sync to other devices lets me switch from my Kindle Paperwhite to my iPhone to my iPod.
    C. Adjusting the text size is so great for those of us (me) who are getting up there in years and our eyesight isn’t what it used to be.
    D. Knowing how long it will take to finish a chapter or book based on my reading speed is so cool. I don’t know why, but this is one of my favorite features.

    There are several more, so I have included a screenshot that links to the Kindle Paperwhite page to show you all the features:

Kindle Paperwhite and Kindle Unlimited. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Features of the Kindle Paperwhite.

  • The accessibility

    A. Instant Upload. All the books added to my Kindle Paperwhite are available within seconds. All you need is an internet connection. (I did not go for the 3G model, as I generally have an internet connection when I purchase new books, so I am able to access them on my Paperwhite.)
    B. The cost of eBooks is generally a good bit less than paperback books and much lower than hardback books and considering how many I go through a week, lower cost is a good thing!
    C. The addition of Kindle Unlimited (not automatically included). When I purchased my Kindle Paperwhite, I got an offer of Kindle Unlimited for $9.99 for 3 months, which is 2 months free, so I took them up on it and I love it. But that is a post for another day.

So I am really loving my new Paperwhite (yes, I am using it before Christmas, but I will wrap and unwrap it as though I am getting it then! 🙂 ) I know that eBooks are not for everyone, it took me a really long time to get comfortable with the idea and even longer to realize that I really do like reading this way. It seems like it doesn’t take me as long to finish an e-Book as it does a printed version.

If you have never tried an eBook before, there is a Kindle app for your phone that is free and there are a lot of free and very low-cost eBooks on Amazon. Just go to the Kindle Store and type 0.00 in the search bar. It will bring up all the free titles. Try a free book to see if you like it, but remember, reading on an actual Kindle is easier than reading one on the app on your phone. It did take some getting used to, but I have really come to enjoy it and it makes traveling with a ton of books so much easier.

Now if they could just make the Paperwhite smell like book pages, it would be absolutely perfect! 🙂

5 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

 

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I whole-heartedly recommend these linked products!

 

One Of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus

With a nostalgia that lends itself to The Breakfast Club, the novel One Of Us Is Lying opens with a detention starring familiar stereotypes:

  • Bronwyn Rojas is the typical brain who is involved in everything from student government to prom committee.
  • Cooper Clay is the jock with college and pro baseball scouts hot on his trail that everyone, from students to teachers to parents, love. He is the all-American boy-next-door.
  • Addy Prentiss is the beautiful blonde homecoming queen with the super hot boyfriend.
  • Nate McAuley is the druggie of the group. You know, the one that no one wants to claim to know.
  • Simon Kelleher is the typical nerd. He is also the one who spreads all the juicy gossip, especially if it will hurt someone.

One of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus. A Propensity to Discuss review.

All of the students in detention claim that they are there because they were framed. Someone slipped a phone into each of their backpacks to be found by a technophobic teacher everyone knows searches backpacks for phones, and they all still have their own phones. The story moves quickly to mayhem because before detention is even half over Simon is dead of an allergic reaction.

When the rest of the group is called in to answer a few questions from the police the mayhem begins to look like murder with Bronwyn, Cooper, Addy, and Nate all at the forefront of the list of suspects.

Simon, you see, had nasty gossip app called “About That” which he used to spread hurtful gossip about fellow Bayview High School students. Of the four suspects, only Nate has ever been called out on Simon’s app and that had to do with a drug arrest that is pretty much common knowledge. But they all have secrets that none of them would want to get out. Except the police don’t know about those, and if Simon had known, he surely would’ve used that against them already. Right?

So why in the world would any of them have murdered Simon? They have no motive, but that doesn’t stop the police from suspecting them. And since the police seem to have tunnel vision toward the four of them, Bronwyn knows they have to find out for themselves who really killed Simon, which may prove difficult since so many students who had been hurt by his gossip had plenty of reasons to hate him.

Karen McManus is quite the storyteller. She is a master of giving just enough information to lead you into the next twist only to bring you to the realization that you still don’t know the truth. For me, these leads and twists intensified my need to know the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the story.

While I would not classify this as a psychological thriller, it does play mind games with you as you try to figure it all out what actually happened. You may get close to figuring it out, but as the story is told through the alternating points of view of each of the suspects, you are left with only what each character wants you to know or believe and finding out the truth about who did it is quite a shock.

As YA (Young Adult) novels go, this one is a bit lengthy and there is quite a bit to keep up with, but I really came to like and admire the characters. They have so much depth to them and are far more than what meets the eye.  – which I find true to life. So many stereotypical people I have gotten to know I’ve truly crushed my initial idea of them from their stereotype. It is the human equivalent of not judging a book by its cover. Don’t judge a person by their stereotype, get to know them or you never know what you are missing out on!

I highly recommend this book, not only to young adults but also to adults. It is a well-written story that covers issues that we see today often in the real world. People are scapegoats and are “convicted” by the media, their peers, and public opinion without anyone having all the facts or arrests, much less officially in a court of law. It certainly leaves you with a lot to ponder.

Book Details

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I whole-heartedly recommend these linked products!

A-Z Book Tag…You’re It.

I found this set of tag questions at on The Book Nerd In Me  Also, this awesome Book Survey Tag is made by Perpetual Page Turner  This is basically a survey with book questions from A to Z.

There are rules to these:

  • If you have been “tagged”, thank the person who Tagged you.
  • You should always reference the person/blog/website where you found the tag
  • You also “tag” someone else to answer.

So here we go…

I found this set of tag questions at on The Book Nerd In Me  Also, this awesome Book Survey Tag is made by Perpetual Page Turner  This is basically a tag with book questions from A to Z.

There are rules to these:

  • If you have been “tagged”, thank the person who Tagged you.
  • You should always reference the person/blog/website where you found the tag
  • You also “tag” someone else to answer.

So here we go…

  • Author you’ve read the most books from?

Karin Slaughter – I have read 17 of her books.

  • Best Sequel Ever? 

 I really liked Perfect by Cecila Ahern which is the sequel to Flawed. (Flawed Review) (Perfect Review)

  • Currently Reading?

One of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus, The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman and listening to The Breakdown by B.A. Paris

A - Z Book Tag Currently Reading. Propensity to Discuss

  •  Drink of Choice While Reading? 

Coca-Cola or coffee if it is cold and raining/snowing. 

  • E-reader or Physical Book? 

 Both, but I’d really rather have a physical book…that smell!

  • Fictional Character You Probably Would Have Actually Dated In High School? 

 Cooper from One of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus

  • Glad You Gave This Book A Chance? 

Definitely Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter (Review)

  • Hidden Gem Book? 

Absolutely The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah (Review)

  • Important Moment in your Reading Life? 

My dad writing a letter to my school librarian when I was in 7th grade giving me permission to check out any book I wanted, no restrictions! You can read about that in this post.

  • Just Finished? 

An Orphan’s Tale by Pam Jenoff

  • Kinds of Books You Won’t Read: 

Horror stories or scary books – but I love a good murder mystery. Let’s just say that because of one Stephen King short story (called The Boogeyman from The Night Shift book) there are no slightly ajar closet doors in my house 40 some odd years later! But I do love his non-horror books! 

  • Longest Book You’ve Read? 

The Once and Future King by T.H. White – 736 pages The Charm School by Nelson DeMille – 800 pages Moby Dick by Herman Melville – around 700 pages

  • Major book hangover because of? 

The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter, The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah and The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom

 

A - Z Book Tag Major book hangover. Propensity to Discuss
(Good Daughter Review)(The Kitchen House Review) (The Nightingale Review

  • Number of Bookcases You Own? 

Five. Yikes, that’s a lot now that I’ve actually counted them. What makes it worse is that there are also a lot of books that aren’t on even on those shelves. I may need help scaling back…Nah! Why would I want to do that? 

  • One Book You Have Read Multiple Times? 

The only one I have read multiple times is To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

  • Preferred Place To Read? 

 The chaise part of my couch or at the beach when I am lucky enough to be there

  • Quote that inspires you/gives you all the feels from a book you’ve read? 

Actually, the thing that comes to mind first for me is the dedication that Colleen Hoover wrote for Without Merit because it is exactly the way I feel about my kids, I’ve just never heard it put so boldly and in such a beautiful and humorous way. “This book is for Cale Hoover. Because I am your mother and I love you, I sometimes have an overwhelming urge to wrap you in a bubble and protect you from the world. But I also have an overwhelming urge to wrap the world in a bubble and protect it from you. Because you’re going to turn it on its head someday. I can’t freaking wait.”

  • Reading Regret? 

 I really don’t know that I have one, except that I regret that I have not yet won a lottery so I can buy all the books I want!

  • Series You Started And Need To Finish (all books are out in series)? 

Not really sure why I didn’t finish The Red Queen Series by Victoria Aveyard

  • Three of your All-Time Favorite Books? 

The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter, (ReviewThe Nightingale by Kristin Hannah (Review) and The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom (Review) OK, so I cheated a little on this one, but quite honestly I get book hangovers on a lot of books (see above) but these were my worst book hangovers and are 3 of my absolute top favorites!

  • Unapologetic Fangirl For? 

Karin Slaughter

  • Very Excited For This Release More Than All The Others? 

The next Will Trent series book from Karin Slaughter, which hasn’t even been named yet, I don’t think!

  • Worst Bookish Habit? 

 Ignoring the rest of the world AKA my family when I am reading. I zone out and don’t hear anything and it drives them nuts. It was a great tool when the kids were teenagers! ~Just kidding…sort of!

  • X Marks The Spot: Start at the top left of your shelf and pick the 27th book?  

An ARC of Wildman by J.C. Geiger

  • Your latest book purchase? 

Without Merit by Colleen Hoover (Review)

  • ZZZ-snatcher book (last book that kept you up WAY late)? 

The last one I read. I am a night-owl anyway, so when I am into a good book, I just stay up and read. 

 

I am tagging these awesome people:

Books In Paradise

Clues and Reviews

Keeper of Pages

Prose and Palate

and all of you who are reading this!

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. 

 

The Orphans Tale by Pam Jenoff. A Propensity to Discuss review.

The Orphan’s Tale by Pam Jenoff

When Noa was 16 years old a German soldier wooed her into bed, resulting in a pregnancy for which her parents kicked her out of their house and their lives since the soldier was gone by the time she knew about the baby. She was sent to a girls’ home and the baby was taken away from her immediately after his birth.

Astrid, a 20 something-year-old Jewish woman from the Klemt family known widely around Europe for the Klemt Family Circus, married a German officer and lived happily with him for several years. Right until the day he came in with divorce papers because Hitler made it illegal to marry or be married to a Jew. Now a 37-year-old woman, Astrid travels back to her homeland, to find all of her family missing. Having been trained on the flying trapeze since she could barely walk, Herr Neuhoff offers her a position with his family’s circus, even though he knows the risks of harboring a Jew.

After her baby was taken Noa began cleaning a train station in exchange for a small room for sleeping and a bit of food. Hearing a strange noise, Noa found a rail car loaded with babies…no mothers, just babies, many of whom were already dead, some barely hanging on, and all would freeze to death within hours. Without actually thinking about the consequences Noa grabs one of the babies. Then, realizing the implications of what she has done, she runs away from the station and what little warmth and security it held for her and out into the snow-covered forest with only the clothes on her back and the baby. When she is later found close to death in the woods she’s taken in by Herr Neuhoff where she and Astrid meet.

Astrid, knowing that her new name and façade could fail at any moment, doesn’t take to Noah very well. Especially since she has to train her to perform on the trapeze in just 6 weeks. She sees her as a threat; Noa’s presence could lead the Schutzstaffel (SS) right back to Astrid. But as they live and work together they begin to form a bond that no one could have ever foreseen. Both have a life to save: For Astrid, it is her own, for Noah, it is the baby she named Theo and both will do whatever it takes to make sure neither life is endangered.

Get your tissues ready! This is a beautifully written story based on actual events in Germany during World War II. Pam Jenoff, a law professor who once worked with Holocaust survivors for the US State Department in Poland, found evidence of two major events, the “Unknown Children” and the Circus Althoff which protected several Jews during the war. She ingeniously melded the two stories together to create The Orphan’s Tale and the result is masterfully written and pays a great tribute to those involved in both circumstances.

Told from the alternating points of view of Astrid and Noa, we learn about their trials, struggles, greatest fears, and what it means to be a family during the most horrific of situations. This is actually a tale of three orphans who actually found love that knew no bounds.

Once you read this, Herr Neuhoff, Noah, Astrid, Peter, and Theo will stay with you long after the last page, as well they should. History, once forgotten, will be repeated. We must keep these stories alive so we never have to bear such atrocities again.

Book Details: 

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. 

 

 

Also by Pam Jenoff:

 

 

Twenty Questions Book Tag. A Propensity to Discuss Tag

Twenty Questions Book Tag. Tag…You’re it!

I have seen a few of these tag posts over the years, but I have noticed lately that there are quite a few of them about books. Not so shocking, I guess, because why wouldn’t there be? Books are awesome! So I thought I would do a tag post every once in a while and see what y’all think.

There are rules to these. You should always reference the person/blog/website where you found the tag and also “tag” someone else to answer.

So, this one came from the Readaholics group page on Goodreads and I have posted my answers on that page, but I am including them here as well. Please respond on the Goodreads page and on my blog if you like. I would love to have you play along! There is a form at the bottom for your answers!

  1. How many books are too many books in a book series? To me, it doesn’t matter. When I find an author that I really like I tend to read everything he/she has written and it doesn’t matter how many books there are in a series. Karin Slaughter’s Grant County and Will Trent series has 14 (6 and 8 respectively) and I started reading Blindsighted (published 2001) the first in the Grant County and Will Trent series, in 2015 when there were already 14 books published between the two series. I love them all and eagerly await more!
  2. How do you feel about cliffhangers? I don’t mind cliffhangers, but if the next book doesn’t have some reminders about the prior book I sometimes get lost in the story and have to go back and skim the previous one.
  3. Hardcopy or paperback? Depends on where I am. I like a paperback if I am near water like the pool, beach or tub, but hardbacks are easier to deal with, as I don’t have to hold them up. That doesn’t sound like a big deal, but with syringomyelia holding your arms in one position for a long time can cause pain.
  4. Favorite book? No. Just no. There are far too many. Hmmm…how about the last one I read? But if I had to make a list there would be several on it. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (this is one of the very few books that I re-read), The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah, The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter
  5. Your least favorite book? The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown. I love the concept, I just found it so very boring. I wish it had been written by David Baldacci or Vince Flynn
  6. Love triangles, yes or no? Not really. Figure out what you want and go for it. There are so many people who never find the one person in life that they really bond with and someone wants me to believe there are so many guys fighting over one girl? Nah.Sorry for the cynicism.
  7. The most recent book you just couldn’t finish? Little Brother by Cory Doctorow, but I am going to give it another shot.
  8. A book you’re currently reading? An Orphan’s Tale by Pam Jenoff
  9. Last book you recommended to someone? The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter (in person) and Good Me, Bad Me by Ali Land on my blog.
  10. The oldest book you’ve read? (Publication date) I am going to have to go with the Bible on this one. Still reading and learning from it.
  11. The newest book you’ve read? (Publication date) Without Merit by Colleen Hoover Published October 3rd, 2017 by Atria Books
  12. Favorite author? No way I can name just one…Karin Slaughter, David Baldacci, Catherine Coulter (FBI Series), Kate DiCamillo, Katherine Howell, James Patterson, Hank Phillippi Ryan
  13. Buying books or borrowing books? Either way, just let me have them!
  14. A book you dislike that everyone else seems to love? The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown (See #5)
  15. Bookmarks or dog-ears? Shame! Bookmarks! Anything can be a bookmark and it doesn’t damage the book!
  16. A book you can always reread? To Kill a Mockingbird
  17. Can you read while hearing music? Yes. Or while the TV is on.
  18. One POV or multiple POV? (POV’ = Points of view) Depends on the story and how well it is written. If it is a cop-out to having a character discover things, then no, but if there are two different people with completely different aspects of a situation then absolutely.
  19. Do you read a book in one sitting or over multiple days? Depends on the book. Many I have read in one sitting, but some I just don’t get into that well and it takes me longer. There are also some that I want to listen to and I do that over several days.
  20. One book you read because of the cover. (This question is different from the Goodreads version, which asks you to tag others to answer the questions.) The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

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