Something in the Water by Catherine Steadman. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Something in the Water by Catherine Steadman

Planning a wedding is certainly a daunting task. Even if everything is going very well and there are no major hiccups. Documentary filmmaker Erin is not long out of grad school and has planned a film about three soon to be released convicted criminals. Mark is an investment banker who has just lost his job and is so despondent that Erin begins to worry that he may be going crazy. So their wedding planning certainly has its hiccups.

Mark’s decline happens very quickly. Even though he must take a government required leave of absence between banking jobs, he is not even through that period when he becomes so miserable and worries that he will never find another job. However, he isn’t really trying that much, just making a few phone calls.

Every time he wants to cut something from the wedding plans, Erin is fine with it. She even makes excuses to reconcile the issue in her mind. They are just not a couple that endears themselves to you at any step of the story.

They do, however, travel first class to Bora Bora for a two-week honeymoon. While there, they see something that they never were meant to see and find something in the water. They make the choice to keep it and head back home where things seem to go from bad to worse.

Not only do they not trust one another, but they are willing to trust people that they do not really even know, even criminals in some cases. All the while there is the idea that someone is being duped, you just don’t really know which one it might be.

And really, I just didn’t even really care by the end.

Honestly, I am not entirely certain why I finished this book. I think maybe just so I could say that I didn’t give up on it. Hoping against hope that something would save it. But, alas, there was really nothing worth saving. It really is not something that I would recommend to anyone. I am giving it 2 stars because of the information about scuba diving, as well as the descriptions of the honeymoon spot. Ms. Steadman would be an amazing locations writer. Her descriptions are beautiful. Psychological thrillers, though, not so much.

2 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

Advertisements
The Book of Essie by Meghan MacLean Weir. A Propensity to Discuss review.

The Book of Essie by Meghan MacLean Weir

Esther Ann (Essie) Hicks is the youngest child of a fire-and-brimstone pastor who, along with his wife and other children make up the reality TV show Six for Hicks, which follows their lives, broadcasting everything they do.

Well, almost everything. As long as Essie’s mother Celia is on board with it being broadcast. So when Celia discovers that Essie is pregnant, she calls the producers together in an emergency meeting to decide exactly what they are going to do about the situation.

Essie knows she cannot tell her mother what she wants because Celia would certainly choose the opposite of what Essie’s plan. So Essie uses everything she knows about how her mother’s mind works to manipulate the situation into one that is favorable for her. She wants to marry Roarke Richards, a senior at her school who also has a secret to hide.

Roarke, having never spoken to Essie before is the weak link in the conspiracy, but there are things Celia Hicks knows that will persuade his parents to agree. Roarke soon finds that there is so much more to Essie than he ever would have imagined.

The fabricated love story is fed to the world through exclusive interviews with an ultra-conservative reporter, Liberty Bell, whose own youth was broadcast to the world, much to her chagrin.

With the exception of the pregnancy, Essie has planned it all and she hopes she can convince Liberty to help her find her sister who hasn’t been seen in more than a couple of years. She will put her life in Liberty’s hands by asking for her help, but she sees no other way out. She has to protect herself, her baby, and now Roarke.

This book also shows the complexities of people, including those on reality shows. We see what the cameras and the producers and the families want us to see, but not true reality.  No one would be willing to be filmed and shown 24/7, so there is no reality in what is being shown, just a fabrication that can be either a very positive role model or a very dangerous weapon that can convince so many people that what they are seeing is, in fact, reality.

This is a really great book even though some of the twists that it takes are not that shocking, the way everything is handled by the family, by Roarke, and especially by Essie is so very well thought out and written.

This book very quickly became unputdownable for me. I wanted to hurry to read what was going to happen, but then I was so very sad when I was finished! I did not want it to be over and I hope that Ms. Weir has more books up her sleeve. This is definitely a highly recommended book!

5 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

 

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

The Barefoot Summer by Carolyn Brown. A Propensity to Discuss review.

The Barefoot Summer by Carolyn Brown

Kate Steele is ready to be done with her newly deceased husband, Conrad. As far as she is concerned, the faster he is buried, the faster she can get back to work and back to her own life. They haven’t really had a real marriage in years, but she refused to divorce him for a million ‘little’ reasons.

But that did not seem to stop Conrad from marrying again. Twice.

When the dirt is about to cover the casket, Kate is shocked to meet Jamie and her daughter Gracie, and pregnant Amanda, both of whom claim to be married to Conrad Steele. Jamie wishes Conrad had not been murdered so she could have the pleasure of murdering him herself, but Amanda, who has only been married about 6 months, is devastated.

When all three women decide to take time to get over the ordeal and the news, they all show up at Conrad’s lakeside cabin in Bootleg, Texas. None of the three women plan to give up their stake on the cabin, so all three decided to stay, all the while being under suspicion and investigated by a detective who believes that one or all of the women had something to do with his murder.

So is one of them be guilty of Conrad’s murder? Or will 3 women who unknowingly shared a husband end up killing each another in a small cabin in the middle of nowhere? Or maybe, just maybe, will this be what each of them needs to heal their broken hearts?

This was a pretty good read, as chick lit goes. It is not going to knock your socks off with the mystery. There are parts of it that are somewhat expected, but it is a feel good, laid-back book that will make you smile, laugh, and perhaps even shed a tear or two. In any case, it is certainly worth the read.

I also really liked Donna Postel‘s narration of the book. She has quite a soothing voice that is easy to listen to and does not go overboard with the southern accent. As this is a Kindle Unlimited option, it also comes with the audiobook free of charge, so I recommend both the Kindle book and the audio, and they switch from one device to the other seamlessly as long as you are connected to wi-fi long enough for them to sync. I love this feature!

The one thing that really bothered me about this book was that almost all of the characters use really bad grammar. Just because southerners talk slowly, it doesn’t mean we are ignorant. We just want to get our point across and make certain that others can understand and comprehend what we’re saying. 🙂 Even dialogs with Janie who is a teacher sometimes have issues with poor grammar and her daughter Gracie’s grammar is horrible. This just should not be the case. Again, just because someone is young, it doesn’t mean their grammar will be incorrect. Grace, growing up with a teacher would have been taught correct grammar. Not to mention, no one corrects it when she speaks in the book. I think that it was supposed to make it more “authentic” in some way, but it actually just doesn’t work for me.

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

Miller's Valley by Anna Quindlen. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen

Mimi Miller’s family has lived in Miller’s Valley for generations and she doesn’t know any other way of life. As she puts it: “No one ever leaves the town where they grew up, even if they go.”

Growing up Mimi listens to her parents’ conversations through the vent in her room, so she knows more than she should. She also knows that her brothers are nothing alike, and neither are anything like her. Her oldest brother went to college and hardly ever comes back. Mimi doesn’t really know anything about him, and that doesn’t bother her all. Her middle brother, Tommy, is her hero and he loves her dearly, even though there are about 10 years between them but she was totally unprepared for the man that he became in Vietnam. 

Bring on the government issues. Miller’s Valley is a very low-lying area that the government is trying to buy out from those who have lived there for generations. They want to dam a river and build a lake, but the people of Miller’s Valley plan to do everything they can to keep that lake from consuming everything they have ever known. And yes, they know they could lose it to eminent domain, but that just makes them want to fight the government even more.

This book is a look back at the 1960s and 70s, the decline of family farming at that time, the Vietnam War and its effects on Mimi’s brother (as a statement to the effects it had on thousands of young men), as well as the fight of being taken seriously that females faced in education. 

This is a coming of age story for Mimi as she sees exactly what is real and important in Miller’s Valley and what will and will not work for their community. It allows you to join Mimi’s world and fight her fights and yes, cry her tears. It is not a book that will keep you up at night. It does not keep you on the edge of your seat. It does not tear you to pieces with worry, or curiosity or laughter, but it does keep you thinking and it does keep your attention.

This is just a solid piece literature that takes a strong look at issues that shaped so many people in the United States in the 60s and 70s and if you grew up during that time, you’ll find a good bit of your life in the pages of this book. I really enjoyed it, even if it is completely different from the books that I usually read.

  • Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen
  • Hardback:  272 pages; Random House; First Edition edition (April 5, 2016)
  • Paperback: 288 pages; Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (June 6, 2017)
  • Kindle:  5774 KB; Random House; Reprint edition (April 5, 2016)
  • Audiobook:  Hours  minutes; Narrated by Brittany Pressley (Narrator), Brilliance Audio (Publisher)

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. “Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

Savannah Blues by Mary Kay Andrews. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Savannah Blues by Mary Kay Andrews

Elouise “Weezie” Foley is an antiques picker with a problem. Or two. Maybe even three. She divorced her cheating husband and his “family money” mother, but she loved the house they bought when they first married. She had turned it from a broken down eye-sore to a Savannah beauty so she didn’t want to leave. The divorce isn’t a problem. Living in the backyard carriage house of the historic house might be. Well, not for Weezie, but her ex’s sexy fiancé, Caroline DeSantos sees it as a huge problem.

Making ends meet is not a problem. Weezie’s business is going very well, and there is this one house that she really, really wants to get some good deals from when its contents go to auction. She wants it enough that she is willing to spend the night out on the grounds to be one of the first ones in the next day. But when she has to “use the facilities” and refuses to go in the woods, she finds herself looking at another huge problem when she stumbles upon a body that just so happens to be the lifeless body of none other than Caroline DeSantos.

A suspect in a murder investigation does have a few problems. Not to mention that someone from her past keeps showing up and trying to get under her skin. Weezie has far too much to do from running her business to working to prove she is not a murderer to have time for anyone new in her life. But, well, you just never know.

In this hilarious tale Weezie and her best friend, BeBe, are extremely funny, willing to go the extra mile for each other, and are the kind of people you want to know. Or at least want to be able to watch their crazy antics. The book does have a murder and mystery to solve, as well as family issues (several family issues) and tales about beautiful Savannah and antique picking. It is a really good beach read or a book for when you need to laugh or giggle. Believe me, you will giggle. Even with a murder, this is a book that makes you feel good as you read it.

I highly suggest this one!

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all“Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”

Friday Focus. A Propensity to Discuss post.

Friday Focus

How can you know if Kindle Unlimited is right for you?

  • Do you read more than 3 or 4 books each month?
  • Are you open to reading debut books from unknown/debut authors?
  • Are you willing to read more than just best-sellers?
  • Do you read multiple genres?
  • Are you interested in having access to more than a million books and audiobooks?

If you answered yes to 3 or 4 of these questions, and you have an extra $100, then Kindle Unlimited (KU) may be a really good choice for you. If you answered no to 3 or 4 of these, then it may not be worth your money.

How much do you read?

I read a lot. I always have. When I was in middle school I fell in love with John Steinbeck’s books (from the high school side of my school library – you can read about that here). Before I retired I was a library media specialist. I always have at least one book with me, if not 3 or 4, and I am usually reading at least 2 books, sometimes as many as 5 at one time. Yeah, I read a lot!

So, what about you? Do your reading habits go back a long way or have you just started reading or reading more? If you pretty much always have a book at your fingertips (either print or eBook), then you might want to look at what KU has to offer.

What do you read?

OK. How about debut books and debut authors? Let me be perfectly honest here: Ten years ago I would have said “No way!” I was what I called a reading snob. I liked certain authors and I was very hesitant to try out new authors or new genres. Why? Because books were/are expensive and if I got one that I didn’t like, I had not yet developed an ability to stop reading it, no matter if it came from the library and I hadn’t paid for it.

Do you have to finish every book?

I have overcome that, however. I generally give a book 50 pages. If I have not gotten into it by then, I probably won’t, so I put it down, almost guilt free. (Almost, not completely!) But if that book is from KU, I don’t feel as guilty about it. Nothing gained, nothing lost. Since this new ability has presented itself to me, I have been much more willing to venture out into other genres and I have found some that I really like.

Do your books have to be best-sellers?

Best-sellers are great. However, there are a few best-selling authors that I just don’t like. Some that I think are hyped by their publishers even though their books are, in my opinion, not good. So while I do check best-seller lists, I don’t let them determine my entire reading list.

That being said, if you keep a check on KU, you’ll find that quite a few best-sellers can be borrowed through KU for a limited time and once it is in your KU library you are free to read it at your leisure. (Many also can be purchased for less than $5 as an eBook for a limited time.)

As I said above, I now read different genres, with the exception of horror and erotica. And yes, having upwards of 90,000 (if you take out the two genres I don’t read) books at my disposal for a once a year fee is worth it to me.

I started my Kindle Unlimited subscription on a trial basis for $9.99 for 3 months. Before I subscribed, I had not really checked out all that it had to offer. Now that I know and have been using it since December or 2017, I love it.

So much to read

There really are over a million titles available on KU. While quite a few of these are debut books, if I don’t like them, I just return them and pick something else. You can have 10 KU books in your library at any time. This works really well for me when I am in a place without access to wi-fi. Yes, those places still exist in my world! No matter, I still have 10 extra books on my Kindle Paperwhite (see my review of that here).

No overdue books.

There are no due dates. Seriously. You can keep a title for as short or as long a time as you wish. No overdues, no late fees. So if one of your grandbabies is visiting and you don’t have time to read much, no worries. The books will be there waiting for you.

Audible Narration

One of the more awesome things I discovered after I downloaded a couple of books, I picked one out and it also had an audiobook available through Audible. To my surprise and delight, the audiobook was also downloaded. Yep, if there is an audiobook of a KU title, you get that as part of your subscription at no extra cost. How cool is that?!

Not only that, but as long as you can connect to wi-fi for less than 30 seconds, you can switch from the eBook to the audiobook and never have to find your place in either one.

So, if you can…

If you can wrap your mind around not carrying around a heavy print book but rather a Kindle or a device with the free Kindle app downloaded to it, and you like to try out new authors with no risk, then Kindle Unlimited is right up your alley.

One Two last things…

There are another couple of things that I have found that I love about reading eBooks: The ability to highlight key phrases or pieces of information and being able to search the book by keyword or phrase. I have always written down quotes that I like from books, and this makes it very easy to highlight great text and then go back to it when I wish.

I am not one to dog-ear pages, that is just a no-no, but I do highlight and underline in them and put post-it notes on those pages so they are easily found, and eBooks just amp this up a notch.

So, what do you think?

Are you more interested in Kindle Unlimited than you were before? Think you might try it out? If you do, I think you’ll find that you like it and use it more than you ever thought you would.

Hope I’ve helped answer some questions about Kindle UnlimitedIf you have more, please don’t hesitate to post them in the comments section and I will answer to the best of my knowledge.

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

 

 

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link to any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all“Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.” 

Friday Focus. A Propensity to Discuss post.

Friday Focus

Coming Soon – A few mystery books that are due out in the next few weeks that I have my sights set on.

The Outsider Stephen King, Friday Focus. A Propensity to Discuss post.

The Outsiders by Stephen King (May 22, 2018) A young boy is found murdered and a little league coach is arrested. But this is Stephen King. You know there is a twist! Hardcover, Kindle, Audiobook

 

The Death of Mrs Westaway by Ruth Ware. Friday Focus. A Propensity to Discuss post.

The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware (May 29, 2018) A tarot card reader by trade, Hal has the gift of cold-reading down pat. When she erroneously receives a letter about an inheritance, she thinks she knows a way to claim the money but attending the funeral makes her believe something is seriously amiss. Hardcover, Kindle, Audiobook

Shelter in Place by Nora Roberts. Friday Focus. A Propensity to Discuss post.

Shelter in Place by Nora Roberts (May 29, 2018) After a mass shooting at a mall in Portland, Maine the survivors try to rebuild their lives, but another incident may prove there is nowhere safe to hide. Hardcover, Kindle, Audiobook

Bring Me Back by BA Paris. Friday Focus. A Propensity to Discuss post.

Bring Me Back by B.A. Paris (June 19, 2018) Ten years ago Finn and Layla, young and in love were on vacation when Layla disappeared. Now Finn is engaged to Layla’s sister Ellen whom he came to know and love through their mutual grief. But now things are beginning to feel strange and reports are coming in that Layla may actually be alive.  Hardcover, Kindle, Audiobook

The Perfect Couple by Elin Hilderbrand. Friday Focus. A Propensity to Discuss post.

The Perfect Couple by Elin Hilderbrand (June 19, 2018) A lavish wedding in Nantucket promises to be an event to remember, especially when a body turns up in the water just before the ceremony. Everyone is a suspect from the wedding guests, to the family and even the happy couple.  Hardcover, Kindle, Audiobook

Liar, Liar by Lisa Jackson. Friday Focus. A Propensity to Discuss post.

LIar, Liar by Lisa Jackson (June 26, 2018) Remmi’s mom, DIdi, has terrible secrets to keep, but when someone ends up dead dressed as Didi, Remmi knows it isn’t really her. Remmi wants to get to the bottom of the story, but someone is willing to kill to keep it hidden. Hardcover, Kindle, Audiobook

Do any of these sound good to you? Are there others you have heard about? Let me know in the comments.

 

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all“Propensity to Discuss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.”