Tag Archives: thriller

Split Second by Catherine Coulter. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Split Second by Catherine Coulter

I decided to read a book from a series that I haven’t read in a while and it honestly is like meeting up with dear friends I haven’t seen in a while. What a welcome surprise! Split Second by Catherine Coulter is actually the 15th book in the FBI series, but I read the others before I started blogging and reviewing books.

Let me just say if you like murder mysteries and police procedure novels, these are all really, really good. They remind me so much of Criminal Minds and that is a good thing! FBI agent Dillon Savich is a computer whiz and when you add his skills in logic to the logic skills of his wife, FBI Agent Lacey Sherlock no criminal is safe.

The stories, though, go much deeper than just the crime fighting. You get to delve into the hearts and minds of so many of the characters in Coulter’s writing. She has a way with words that pulls you in and allows you to connect with Savich and Sherlock, as well as the other agents with whom they work.

In Split Second Savich stops a robbery in a convenience store close to his home, but something about the scene feels off to him. Meanwhile, there is a killer on the loose who meets women at bars, takes them home and then garrotes them with wire. All of this at the same time that Agent Lacy Carlyle’s father passed away, with an ominous message just before he died. Bringing all of these stories to full circle takes so much skill in writing and Coulter handles it all with the flourish that is a trademark of her writing.

This is a great addition to this series and one that I highly recommend!

Catherine Coulter’s FBI Series in order leading up to Split Second:

  1. The CoveA (1996)
  2. The MazeA (1997)
  3. The TargetB (1998)
  4. The EdgeB (1999)
  5. RiptideC (2000)
  6. Hemlock BayC (2001)
  7. Eleventh Hour (2002)
  8. Blindside (2003)
  9. Blowout (2004)
  10. Point Blank (2005)
  11. Double Take (2007)
  12. Tailspin (2008)
  13. KnockOut (2009)
  14. Whiplash (2010)
  15. Split Second (201)
  16. Backfire (2012)
  17. Bombshell (2013)
  18. Power Play (2014)
  19. Nemesis (2015)
  20. Insidious (2016)
  21. Enigma (2017)

Omnibus Editions:

  1. The Beginning. 2005. (containing The Cove & The Maze)
  2. Double Jeopardy. 2008. (containing The Target & The Edge)
  3. Twice Dead. 2011. (containing Riptide & Hemlock Bay)
  4. Second Shot. 2014. (containing Eleventh Hour & Blindside)

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. 

Advertisements
The Lion's Game by Nelson DeMille. A Propensity to Discuss review.

The Lion’s Game Nelson DeMille

An international murderer code-named “The Lion” has defected to the U.S. for diplomatic immunity and is flying into New York’s JFK Airport to be met by the American Terrorist Task Force (ATTF) team, including former NYC detective John Corey. But upon arrival, the ATTF finds that it is now The Lion’s Game that they are playing.

Ashad Khalil is a Libyan terrorist with a mission to avenge his family and his country and is now on a bloodthirsty mission. John Corey, with his beautiful new partner, Kate Mayfield, are desperate to find him before even more people are killed. But the question remains: Is he still in the U.S. or did he escape back to Libya?

Nelson DeMille first introduced John Corey in the novel Plum Island and in The Lion’s Game he still has issues following orders, still dislikes Ted Nash and is still one of the most sarcastic and funny characters in police work, but now he’s with a not so willing to laugh FBI unit fighting terrorism.

A truly engrossing story as only Nelson DeMille can deliver. If you read Plum Island, you’ll want to read this next book in the series. If not, start there. This is a series that everyone who likes spy rings, espionage and government conspiracy theories will love!

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link

This post may contain affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products!

The Good Daughter. A Propensity to Discuss review.

The Good Daughter – Karin Slaughter

I have said it before and here it is again: The absolute biggest problem with reading a Karin Slaughter book is finishing and having the agony of waiting for the next one! That being said, The Good Daughter follows true to form.

Rusty Quinn was a man of many words and many beliefs. First and foremost he believed that everyone had a right to a fair trial, which is why he defended the vilest of the vile, always knowing that his family was shunned in their small town because of his cases. And then it all came crashing down around him.

Twenty-eight years ago two men came looking for Rusty but instead found Gamma, the wife he adored, and his daughters Sam and Charlie. The night left Gamma dead and Charlie and Sam fighting for their lives. The events, told this time from Charlie’s point of view, detail what happened to her mother and her sister and how she ran as fast as she could to escape.

Charlie has been running ever since.

Fast forward 28 years to a horrifying shooting that rocks the small town and Charlie finds herself right in the middle of it, peeling the scabs off of the wounds that had never really healed. Head-strong, willful, deeply angry Charlie throws herself headlong into making things right. Rusty, as usual, is the only one ready to defend the girl at the center of this egregious crime again putting his life in jeopardy.

Once again, Karin Slaughter has managed to write a novel that is both grisly and beautiful, lurid and poignant. A book about hatred and healing, fear, and misunderstanding. A book about the power of forgiveness and the desperation of hate.

As with most of Karin Slaughter’s books, the audio version of The Good Daughter is read by Kathleen Early who, as always, brings something specific to every character, even if it is in just a subtle way. She does a superb job of relaying the anguish, the love, the hurt and the hate in a way that leads you straight into the mind of each and every character. I could listen to her read all day and all night. Especially if it was a Karin Slaughter novel.

I recommend this book wholeheartedly Five out of five stars for writing. Five out of five stars for the audio. But beware, once you begin, you are opening your heart for one huge emotional ride!

5 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products! If you click on the link and make a purchase, I receive a small payment, but it does not affect your cost at all. 

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore

A mystery and a bookstore. What more could a thriller-reading bibliophile ask for? Well, according to this book, a lot more. Like 3 mysterious story lines all coming together at the end to explain, very feasibly, why a young man who spent almost all of his time in the Bright Ideas Bookstore decided to hang himself in the one place he felt most at home.

Around Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore, Lydia is beginning to lock up for the night when she finds Joey, one of the “BookFrogs” (sad and lonely people who spend all of their free time in the bookshop) hanging from the rafters. Added to the horror, she finds a picture of herself at 10 years old in his pocket.

Having been hiding from the world in plain sight for the last 10 years, she is shocked to see that someone has made a connection between her and “Little Lydia.” Twenty years ago Little Lydia’s picture in Life magazine shocked a nation and since then she has done everything she can to free herself from her past.

But Joey’s death and the items that he left for her in his room at the boarding house send her reeling back to an unsolved case that has haunted her for 20 years. As she works to unravel the clues that Joey left, her own past unexpectedly comes crashing in around her.

Matthew Sullivan’s Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore is a look into the lives of so many people, including the BookFrogs and will make you take a serious look at the lonely people that we encounter daily, and at the lives that one individual life can touch. Soulful, sometimes heartbreaking, and a bit mesmerizing, this book is a really good read.

An audio version of Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore is also available.

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

Check out all the books, movies and TV shows I have reviewed on the blog by clicking this link.  

This post may contain affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from NetGalley in return for an honest review. I received this book free from NetGalley in return for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

The Chemist by Stephenie Meyer

A while back I purchased The Chemist by Stephenie Meyer, but it sat on a shelf unread. I’m not really sure why, as I read and really liked The Host and to be honest, I loved the Twilight series.

This book, however, is a far cry from Twilight! Where that series has been raked over the coals by many reviewers, critics, feminists and the like for having a weak female character, The Chemist is 180 degrees in the opposite direction!

The Chemist. A Propensity to Discuss review.

Alex/Julianna is quite formidable. Having worked for a government agency of operations so dark, the organization didn’t even have a name, her work was to stop terror attacks from reaching American soil. But when someone in that agency turned the tables, Alex became the hunted.

After being on the run for 3 years, her former handler has found her, assured her she is safe and is asking her to come back and stop what could be the worst terror attack the world has ever seen. Her conscience won’t let her walk away, so she walks back into a world of people who want her dead. But this time she has more to protect than ever before.

All in all, I really liked this book. The characters were believable, likable and realistic, with pretty much non-stop action. This is not a love story with action thrown in, this is an action-thriller with a love interest that does not take over the story, it just enhances it. So if you like thrillers, read this one. If you are hoping for a Twilight type of love story, you’re not getting it here. The Chemist is much more realistic and a story for those who like mysteries, thrillers, and espionage.

The audio version of The Chemist is read by Ellen Archer.

 

4 Stars. A Propensity to Discuss Review.

 

This post contains affiliate links. I would never include an affiliate link on any product that I would not completely endorse. So if you choose to purchase through this link, I get a small payment that does not affect your price at all. And I wholeheartedly recommend these linked products!

Dark. Dark. Dark Places.

Dark Places by Gillian Flynn takes you to gloomy, murky, threatening places. Sinister.  Spellbinding. Suck-you-in-spit-you-out sinister places. It is a story of twists and turns that you never really suspect. The story will wind you up into a tight ball of nerves. The ending will ring you out like a washing machine on steroids.

Dark Places by Gillian Flynn. A Propensity to Discuss post.

Dark Places by Gillian Flynn.

At seven, Libby Day lives through the brutal attack and murder of her two sisters and her mother. She escapes. She lives. As does her brother. He had to live through it. After all, he murdered them. Libby testified against him. He was sentenced to life in prison.

Libby moves on in her life; becomes successful despite her beginnings. Ben spends the rest of his life in prison. Ahhh. No. Not so much. Way off.

So many people are convinced that Ben is innocent. But Libby knows the truth. To prove them wrong, she starts to dig. She knows she told the truth. But did she? Before the truth is revealed, Libby will find herself in a world of danger. And, quite unexpectedly, a world of acceptance.

As the story unfolds in Libby’s current world, flashbacks from her mother and brother bear witness to what the seven-year old Libby did not know, see, realize or understand.

A downright must read.